Diecast Model Ferrari F430 – As Easy to Assemble as it is on the Eyes

Diecast Model Fever!

In other words, never give me power tools.

Power tools! No, that’s not what this post is about, but this week I got to be totally unnecessary and over the top in my tool-age for putting together a model car. Did I need a high powered Ryobi drill to put my Ferrari together? No. Did I use one anyway? YEP, you betcha!

Honestly, if I wasn’t such a flibbertigibbet, I would have this thing together in a few minutes, instead of the near hour it took me. But, I’m clumsy and easily distracted, which resulted in most of my model-time being dominated by Youtube videos and a few too many left over Easter chocolates. If any of you are smarter than a fifth grader (reference intended), you’ll have your model put together super fast and’ll be left with a stunning, candy apple red Ferrari to put on your desk or a shelf. Lets get started!

1: The Legendary Ferrari F430

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The Ferrari F430 is a sports car that was produced by the Italian car manufacturer Ferrari from 2004 to 2009. A successor to the Ferrari 360, it debuted and was first seen at the 2004 Paris Motor Show. Its replacement, the Ferrari 458, was unveiled on the 28th of July,2009. Designed by Pininfarina under the  guidance of Frank Stephenson, the body styling of the F430 was revised from its predecessor, the Ferrari 360, to improve its aerodynamic efficiency. Although the drag coefficient remained the same, downforce was greatly enhanced.

Despite sharing the same basic Alcoa Aluminum chassis, roof line, doors and glass, the car Screen Shot 2015-05-06 at 1.24.32 PMlooked significantly different from the 360. A great deal of Ferrari heritage was included in the exterior design. At the rear, the Enzo’s tail lights and interior vents were added. The car’s name was etched into the Testarossa-styled driver’s side mirror. The large oval openings in the front bumper are reminiscent of Ferrari racing models from the 60s, specifically the 156 “sharknose” Formula One car and 250 TR61 Le Mans cars of Phil Hill.

You don’t get much more awesome than the Ferrari Spider which is the convertible version of this enigmatic coupe. With awesome performance and a beautiful design, it was only a matter of time before they put it into model form. With an MSRP of $186,925 to $217,318 in the United States, £119,500 in the United Kingdom, approximately €175,000 in the European Union, and $379,000 for the base model to $450,000 for the Spider F1 in Australia and New Zealand, this isn’t likely a car that’ll make it into everyone’s driveway. But now you can have one at a fraction of the cost and er…a fraction of the size.

2: The BOX! 

The only thing better than a pretty new toy is a pretty box! In line with the extraordinary design of the car itself, Maisto took extra care to design a box that was just as aesthetically Screen Shot 2015-05-06 at 1.24.41 PMappealing. You can always tell the amount of workmanship a company puts into their products by its packaging. If they don’t care enough to create packaging worthy of their product, then it’s obviously not worth your money. I was absolutely delighted with the packaging of my Ferrari and, as much as I’m against clutter, I practically  wanted to keep the box!

The front is detailed in a window style that Screen Shot 2015-05-06 at 1.24.51 PMdisplays the body of the car and two sets of rims, and has a lovely picture of the finished car. The back shows all thirty six parts and gives a bit of information about the assembly process and the car itself. Nothing too overly complicated which I like, had it been in anyway intimidating, I may have left it on the store shelf!

3: Parts

When I first opened the box I’d expected it to explode with teeny tiny pieces that I would find myself losing in a matter of seconds. After all, thirty six parts does sound like quite a lot, but  they were the perfect size to hold and snap into place with little to no effort at all. No glue, no tweezers, no fuss, hassle or mess. This thing was like a dream. The headlights were a little Screen Shot 2015-05-06 at 1.24.57 PMtricky but that was due to my own ignorance. I put them in pretty close to the beginning and every time I turned the car upside down to add another piece, they fell out. I can say that, even though no glue was necessary, if I could redo it, I’d add a dab of Elmer’s or maybe something stronger just to keep them in place permanently.

4. Construction Time 

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I got my drill, my Ferrari model, a hand full of chocolate Easter eggs and got to work. Now, putting the chocolate down to start my project wasn’t the easiest of tasks, but I muscled through it and got busy. Out of the box, the car itself was beautiful, even before it was put Screen Shot 2015-05-06 at 1.25.12 PMtogether. The diecast metal body was painted a bright, shiny, candy apple red that I wish I could  have covered in glitter because honestly, that was the only thing that could have made it any better. I thought the diecast metal, being, well, metal, would be super heavy and hard to keep a grip on, but it was the perfect weight. I mean, I wouldn’t throw it at anyone, but it didn’t feel like a burden to hold. Once everything was screwed (drilled) and popped into place, the finished product was nothing short of awe-inspiring. I couldn’t be happier with my little project. Shop72 has done it again!

Like this car? Buy it here!

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